My elementary teachers will not like this

I have seen the video of Joey Ayala’s TEDxDiliman talk speech and performance last November. Back then, viewers already had multiple reactions seeing the performance. Some lauded the idea; others questioned the attempt. Today the video marks a million viewers, makes it to national news and the cyber bashers see to it that are heard as they throw hatred to the artist and to his ideas.

It saddens me that most of our people are not aware of what TedTalksConference or even TEDx is about. It saddens me that such venue for young innovators, free thinkers, and fresh voices is a taboo for a community that clamors for the full exercise of democracy. But what saddens me the most is the ignorance, often confused with the concept of nationalism, used as a sole basis for a commentary.

We need to understand that Joey Ayala is not promoting a new movement. He is not even asking any of us to change the National Anthem. In fact, he knew that those actions are not even legal. We need to understand that Joey Ayala was merely sharing his observations on how we usually sing the Anthem (which made a lot of sense to me) and his bright ideas of altering the words so we can probably be inspired to do something for our country (something that I personally don’t support because the original lines still make sense to me). He is merely exercising his right as a person, as an artist, and as a Filipino to speak and to share his ideas in a venue that recognizes a person, an artist, and even a Filipino who has the courage to do so.

And in any free country, people should also learn how to respect anyone people who exercises his rights as a thinking individual. 

Here is the Link to the video: Joey Ayala at TEDxDiliman

Photo Credits: http://nickledimepenny.blogspot.com/2010/05/philippine-national-anthem-lupang.html

NOTE: TEDx is an international community that organizes TED-style events anywhere and everywhere — celebrating locally-driven ideas and elevating them to a global stage. TEDx events are produced independently of TED conferences, each event curates speakers on their own, but based on TED’s format and rules.

TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). TED began in 1984 as a conference where Technology, Entertainment and Design converged, and today covers almost all topics — from science to business to global issues — in more than 100 languages. Meanwhile, independently run TEDx events help share ideas in communities around the world.

Ideas worth spreading

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